Pictonaut Challenge: Audionaut Drowning in Sound Doodle…

Thwum. Thwum. Thwum. Thwuuuuuuuuuum…

Drum roll please. *Drum rolls and a cymbal crash* Thank you. Following up the Pictonaut story post of the other day, here’s an extra doodle…

An Audionaut drowning in sound...

An Audionaut drowning in sound…

These inky scribblings are the result of a convergence of several things. One: I haven’t done much drawing recently and need to get my sketchin’ fingers working again ahead of some projects (namely, teaching Italian children in interactive fashion and participating in a daily drawing challenge in August). Two: my Pictonaut story was very bleak and political and I wanted to produce something that celebrated aural love and imaginative escapism as well. John Steele’s piece does that and I direct you over to his site where you can find details about the monthly Pictonaut challenge from the High Priest himself. Three: I seem to spend a lot of time with headphones on submerging myself in soundscapes and at the moment my mind is mainly swimming through Random Access Memories. I’m all about electro-sensory stimulation: hence this quick tech-sketch.

Now, back to riding those basslines, feeling the beats and tuning into to the pure electric energy and harmonious melodic spirit through my plugged-in headphones…

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Pictonaut Short Story Challenge: ‘They Were in My Head and Allah was Dead’…

Oh grief! It’s that time of the month again and you’re going to have to suffer through some disturbing horror for a short period. I’m talking about my Pictonaut Short Story Challenge effort, of course, but don’t worry because the ordeal doesn’t last that long and you may actually find it a worthwhile experience. To recap, every month I study a picture picked by John Steele the Just and Steely and write something inspired by it. It’s a nice challenge and I encourage people to have a crack at it to get their creative juices flowing and conjure up some fresh short fiction. For May’s wordascope the Rogue Verbumancer opted for a photo from designer Mike Kim and it was electric with exciting potential…

Audionaut photo by Mike Kim.

Can you feel the exhilarating charge? Techno-techno headgear! Bright jumpsuits! Futuristic minimalist spaces! So many ideas come to mind and I got high on the possibility of spawning some futuristic sci-fi. I thought about tapping the human-mind-and-tech fusions of films like Paprika and Inception and exploring virtual realities fabricated out of beautiful dreams. Alternatively, I thought I might get a bit dystopian and write something that ripped of Neuromancer or The Matrix. It’s an image used to advertise a high-fidelity audio symposium, so how about harmonising with the sonic resonances of all the electro music I’ve been listening to lately to write something that rides on synthesiser riffs and is all about dynamic aural energy?

What did I do in the end? Well, the sweeter hard sci-fi plan spontaneously dematerialised and the words that came out were not righteous techno-techno thrills. They were instead informed by the War on Terror and the piece of work I’ve titled ‘They Were in My Head and Allah was Dead‘ is way different than what I thought I was going to end up produce. I’ll leave you to make of it what you will (the golden rule: show don’t tell) though I’ll preface it with a warning that it is not intended as pleasant reading.

They Were in My Head and Allah was Dead is my Pictonaut effort for May, then. It’s not fun so I may make up for that by spawning something else inspired by the image to accompany it before the month is over. All being well I’ll be back with a fresh story in July after a break in June but for now, go forth and write your own Audionaut-inspired story and read mine if you like…

Homespun Threads Anthology: a Lot of Fairytale Wonder at Little Price…

Fair morning to ye, fair faerie folk! Here’s a brief post to push something on you which I hope doesn’t come across as hard sell. Please, accept this as a friendly soft sell (not Soft Cell) and accordingly act upon my words and go and invest in something that’s a bit special.

That thing that’s a bit special is the Homespun Threads: A Patchwork of Fairytales anthology. It’s an eBook of 35 stories written by an array of excellent writers to raise extra funds for the Homespun Theatre company. This weekend they’re performing their children’s theatre show East of the Sun, West of the Moon at the Rondo Theatre in Bath and here’s a blogpost written by anthology editor/company publicity guru Ali George with further details. Put simply, money raised from the eBook sales helps them make more theatre.

But why should I spend money on an eBook of fairytales?” you may protest as you look up from the digi-reader-device that was not absorbing your full attention anyway. (You’re reading 50 Shades of Gandalf the Grey in public. Tsssk. Have you no shame?) Because! Because of all the reasons Ali listed in that link! And to add my own reasons: Because fairytales are timeless and this particular collection of faerie tale-esque stories is particularly superb. Excellent writers have produced a wonderful array of fantastical threads and I do believe that there’s something for everyone and every mood in the mix.

A brief skip through some of the treasures you’ll find in the anthology: dragons; talking cats; sleeping giants; lost and vexed princesses; friendly selkies; dastardly witches; wise mirror men; cunning kings; aetherial dance parties; birch trees that want a career in BBC comedy; ditsy sheep; enchanted metamorphosis-inducing sticks; wax girls; a moon child; swooping snowbirds; and so much more. I’ve got a haiku verse story about a Japanese folk figure in there as well which you may like. If you don’t, there are 34 better alternatives on hand to excite your imagination. If you don’t buy it you’re missing out and you may be sorry later when a Scottish man comes to kiss your eyes as punishment for not reading his work.

What’s more – and this is the major incentive at this very moment –  the anthology is on sale. For the half-term weekend Homespun Threads: A Patchwork of Fairytales anthology is available for 99p in the several places it can be downloaded from (not including tax). That’s 35 short stories for under a pound. The correct response to this would be “I’d buy that for a dollar!” except you’re buying it for under a pound and if you’re paying in American dollars it’ll be $1.50. Even so, it’s a great deal for a great deal.

I encourage you to go forth, make your small purchase and immerse yourself in a rich myriad of marvellous tales. It’ll be good for children’s theatre and it’ll be good for your imagination…

Malmö Mysteries: The Big Questions of Eurovision 2013…

Saturday night television is a terrifying experience that bombards you with challenging questions and leaves you with minor cerebral trauma. This weekend wild rampaging question marks came flying thick and fast like crazy. The box baffles, bamboozles, bedazzles and brainscrambles you, blows your mind and and leaves you bobbing like a goldfish, open-mouthed, awestruck and only able to utter phrases that end in “?”.

You were watching BBC1 on Saturday night, right? (I watched Saturday night on Sunday morning on BBC iPlayer ’cause that’s how we watch TV these days ’cause we are Techno-Techno-backed Masters of Time and Audiovisual Space, awww yeah. *presses red button*) It was the series finale of Doctor Who and that was a shock of suspense and surprise that subsequently inspired the masses onto internet message boards to try and work out what it all meant. There are many questions and too few answers. Nonetheless, I’m not overly concerned with the Doctor Who enigmas. I’m mainly caught up in questions around Saturday night’s other epic televisual event.

The Eurovision Song Contest 2013, comrades! It is beautiful and baffling. I’m glad that this blast of kitsch theatricality and celebration of music and human spirit comes back every year. We need showpiece events like this to remind us of the important things in life (love, friendship that transcends all boundaries, artistic expression, zestful silliness) and watching Eurovision “feels like I’m flying, like if I had wings, like I am sailing on a sea of dreams…”

Even so, Eurovision is also slightly disturbing. It’s got this weird infectious energy and I think I’ve got it caught in my system to the point that several days later I can’t stop thinking about it and am still humming “Only Teardrops“. It’s also got me in the grip of anxiety and riddled with questions, more so than the Doctor Who climax.

Seriously, the secrets of the Universe may be harmoniously hidden in this whole mercurial shabang. There are subtexts and strange mysteries in every song – and the ceremony as a whole, in fact – and each individual entry probably deserves an academic essay of its own. I don’t have the time or energy to do that though (the contagion has exhausted me and I’m reeling) so instead I’ll simply raise a few of the riddles that really stand out from Saturday’s continental popstravaganza.

In case anyone else out there is similarly curious/infected or can provide theories or answers, here are some Eurovision questions that are driving me (literally) insane…

Ukraine: Where did the 7ft8in giant go? What became of this mighty titan and his feathery headpiece after he carefully set Zlata Ognevich down upon her spotlit rock?

Lithuania: Where did Andrius Pojavis get a pair of shoes called “Love” and “Pain”? Which one is left and which one is right? The wearing of these shoes appears to be significant and problematic in his love life so why doesn’t he just opt for different footwear?

Greece: Why is the alcohol free? Where are you getting the free alcohol, oh happy Koza Mostra men? Shouldn’t we be taxing this alcohol to try and stimulate the utterly-smashed Greek economy?

Romania: Cezar, can you bite me so I can became a Grand Opera Dracula as well?

Finland: “Whatchu waiting, whatchu waiting for?” Hey hesitant lover of the outstandingly desperate Krista Siegfrids! Where is her proposal? When are you going to marry her and allow her to fully enjoy her anti-feminist fantasy?

Malta: What happened to Jeremy (he works in IT and “likes his rigorous routine… risk assessment is his investment in a life of no surprise“) when he followed the oh-so-distant manic pixie dream girl (“she’s spontaneous indeed, uncertainty’s her creed, and she has always been neither black or white, just a curious delight“) into tomorrow?

Armenia: how did Tony Iommi – the Black Sabbath guitarist and thimble-fingered god-like genius who invented heavy metal – come to compose this thing for Armenia? Anyway, to the questions asked in the song itself (and it’s a song made out of questions): ” Who’s the one that starts a war? Who’s dictating what is less and more? Who can change the night and day? Who’s the one with clever face? That can tell us what is in the space?” Skipping to the chorus: “Lonely planet, who has done it? Who can save you? Who can stop it? Lonely planet, who has done it? Who can save you? Who can stop it?

Denmark: “Eye for an eye, why tear each other apart? Please tell me why, why do we make it so hard?” On to the chorus: “How many times can we win and lose? How many times can we break the rules between us? Only teardrops? How many times do we have to fight? How many times till we get it right between us? Only teardrops?

Russia: “What if I could change the path of time? What if I had the power to decide? What if I could make us unified? … What if we would open up the doors? What if we could help each other more? What if I could make you all believe? … What if we all opened our arms? What if we came together as one? What if we aimed to stop the alarms? What if we chose to bury our guns? Why don’t we always reach out to those who need us the most?

Dina Garipova believes that “the answer lies within our hearts and minds” but she only came 5th which was sad ’cause she was my favourite (Denmark was probably my third favourite though so I’m not unhappy with the end result). I just don’t know. Altogether, I’m confused and am not sure that I feel very well. I’m going to go and lie down in a dark, silent room until the earworms and impossible questions go away. Erm… see you next year in Denmark!

Doing Life Daily, Rocking Rubber Bands and Lessons from a Basketball Legend…

Oh my!” as George Takei who voices my internal monologue would say. Things got quite serious the other day. I’d like to briefly follow that up with something a bit more smiley but, likewise, slightly life-affirmative and semi-profound. I will do that by directing you nice people reading to this link: a recent article for the Esquire Culture Blog by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in which he outlines 20 things he wished he known when he was 30.

Life lessons from a living legend and, indeed, I do find that NBA basketball players (both active and retired) are actually some of the inspirational, philosophical public figures out there. Regardless of my own affection for that game and for the 7-foot-and-2-inches dude with the sublime skyhook shot, a role in Airplane! and a fight against Bruce Lee on his personal record, there are sage words for everyone in that piece. It’s interesting to read for me as someone in his mid-20s though, as ever with this sort of stuff, the advice rings true regardless of age. Age is an elastic concept that you can stretch and bend like a rubberband. “Fwip“. That was the band flying across the room ’cause you’re not gonna let the vulcanised binding time tag bring you down. You own that band, you are the boss of that band and you wear it how you damn well please…

Anyhow, stretching back to the subject at hand, some of Kareem’s thoughts are less relevant to me (mainly the romantic tips) but others resonate – particularly the parts about patience, compassion and practicing yoga. To pick a potent one that I reckon is crucial for everyone on this perturbed planet, here’s lesson 16 abridged…

Don’t be so quick to judge. It’s human nature to instantly judge others. It goes back to our ancient life-or-death need to decide whether to fight or flee. But in their haste to size others up, people are often wrong… We miss out on knowing some exceptional people by doing that, as I’m sure I did…. You have to weigh the glee of satisfaction you get from arrogantly rejecting people with the inevitable sadness of regret you’ll eventually feel for having been such a dick.

And who wants to feel like a dick and handle a whole lot of self-humiliation and regret? Judgementalism is a drain and a dud mindset to drag along everywhere – open-hearted, open-minded compassion should be the modus operandi and we, as a society, need more of that and less of the judging. (That’s just my opinion, and I’ve already outlined how my opinion and judgements are irrelevant. See? Who needs judgement?!)

Overall, I suppose the main point of this post: compassion and conscious awareness make you a better human being and the world a better place. There are so many articles, blogposts, guidebooks and manifestos on how to live your life, be creative, get by, succeed, thrive, achieve, rock ‘n’ roll, be awesome, be honourable and so on so so on in existence out there. It’s neverending and endlessly repetitive but, nevertheless, reading them is always worthwhile because there’s always at least one point of quasi-mystical, profound truth in each individual one. Like repeating mantras, if you engage with wise advice and profound principles on a daily basis you absorb it and it becomes a conscious, cognised feature of life.

I genuinely believe that a daily dose of this kind of stuff works, whatever your preferred brand or format is (aphorisms, motivational quotes, Zen proverbs, inspiring articles, self-affirmations, creative tips, spiritual principles or tenets, etc., etc.). I don’t intend for this to sound like a self-help guru spiel – the fact is that we’re all living-and-thinking-and-functioning sentient organisms with souls and we’re all innately entwined in an ecosystem with other organisms. This is just about doing life, and a daily reminder that we’re doing life where we challenge ourselves on “how we do life” is, I’d say, an essential part of being a functioning human being.

Today, waking up and reading the wisdom that Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has accumulated through his life experience reinforced many things I already knew but gives me the opportunity to appreciate ’em afresh. I want to be a better human being and I don’t want to be an old man bewailing about all my regrets and how much of an idiot bastard I was in younger years. Consequently, I’ll keep listening and looking around, regularly for the greater righteous good (it’s good for me, good for those around me and good for the great cosmic grand scheme of things).

I hope that doesn’t read like an overly preachy rant (I’m very deep and serious on this blog all of a sudden) and I’ll wrap this thing up in a colourful stretchy rubber band with this: a little bit of learning, compassion and conscious awareness every day potentially goes a long, long way…

Now go elsewhere with an open-mind and sense of warm affability and find someone really erudite and sage to absorb immense insight and wisdom from…

Inspirational Heroes Emerging Out of Shame’s Shadow…

This is a serious post and serious posts are not something I enjoy writing. I’d rather dwell in the realms of light-hearted whimsy and enjoy myself rather than getting down into the dirty moop. I’m more eager to follow a  “Why so serious?” mantra in my online activity and push an upbeat, perky and proactively positive persona. There’s a lot of bleakness out there and the web doesn’t need another dour avatar face doling out the grimness, bitching and moaning about bad stuff. This is all good and keeps me happy, but there’s also a downside. That downside is denial of reality and that denial may have a detrimental effect in the grand scheme of things.

I try not to get drawn into depressing current affairs debates and dive into popular shitstorms. I also try not to overshare and force my personal daily life problems down people’s throats. I have a history of heath problems and used to blog extensively about them but it got too painful and I felt like a raw, exposed nerve. I felt defined by illness and found myself engaging with communities and cyberspaces that were all about disease and depression. It was very unhealthy and unhelpful and it got me down so I shut it all down, closed off those connections and channelled my attentions elsewhere. The bare shame and scar tissue were hidden and covered by a thick jumper, out of sight and out of mind.

It was the right thing for me to do way back when but it was also, in part, a retreat into denial. The end outcome is that there’s a separation of self-image from sombre real life issues in public spaces. I keep on with conscious self-censorship and try not to talk about my past and present health crap online. (There’s a lot of it, it’s boring and I’ve more than had enough of it for a lifetime thank you very much) I’m ashamed, both because of my shame and because the shame prevents me from being totally honest about myself and then I wonder whether I should just rename myself “Shame Clayton” and live in the wilderness in an igloo made of frozen, guilty tears.

All the wider world gets is occasional cryptic outbursts on Twitter that elicit confused sympathy from some very nice people. (And I’m grateful for the concern and best wishes in those moments, so thank you!) When I do have those moments I end up blurting out because I want to urge others to enjoy their lives as much as possible and cherish good heath while they’ve got it. My power to do that, however, is limited though because of the taboos I’ve taken on. I don’t have the courage or conviction to back it up and run with it, so I stick to irreverent discussion of pop culture and 99% of the time that’s perfectly okay with me.

I’ve therefore got a tremendous amount of admiration for people who actually do what I can’t do – genuine human beings who are so much braver than me in that they actually power through silence, shame, stigma and various other hang-ups to talk about the things that just aren’t talked about. I’m in awe of people who open themselves up and express themselves eloquently and creatively  to inform, educate and inspire others. It’s a risky move and it can be incredibly painful, but there’s a chance that in publicly discussing problems they beat stigma and ignorance. They may potentially save someone’s life.

As I say, I can’t do it but several events move me to write this short, serious post in praise of those that do. Today Angeline Jolie has written a piece in the New York Times explaining her decision to get a preventative double mastectomy. Here an infamous public figure is putting their physical and mental scar tissue on show and doing so to raise awareness of breast cancer. The issue is, for the present moment, out in the open and people are enlightened and possibly empowered if they were living in doubt and fear. That’s a win for knowledge and wider worldwide wellbeing. It’s a blow for cancer and the result is that much suffering may ultimately be prevented. This is why I don’t agree with those who sneer at celebrities for preaching about serious health issues from positions of comfort. By virtue of their fame they have way more influence and reach than any public service ad campaign or initiative. When someone like Russell Brand describes drug addiction in the Guardian or Magic Johnson makes a documentary about HIV people take note and come away armed with knowledge and possibly entertained and uplifted.

That’s showbiz, but I’m even more awed by those who aren’t celebrities and don’t have massive media attention or media resources supporting their bold decision to put it all out in the open. My main inspiration for writing this post is the artist Katie Green who is both a lovely person and a brilliant illustrator. For years Katie has been working on her graphic novel Lighter Than My Shadow which is an autobiographical memoir of her experience with eating disorders. She’s delved into all the pain of the past to write and entirely hand-draw a 507-page chronicle in comic panels. That’s immense and insane. It defies comprehension. It is possibly the boldest creative project I’ve ever encountered yet and I’m looking forward to finally getting a hold of the thing when it’s released in early October.

Katie says it all best in her blog in which she provides insights into her reasons for writing and drawing Lighter Than My Shadow. She is so right about breaking the silence and challenging secrecy. Her artwork is beautiful, her voice is authentic and it’s a guarantee that the final published thing will be an astounding work that will inform and inspire people. We’re dealing with a devastatingly destructive illness and I’ve experienced its awful impact firsthand (but we don’t want to go there). By making this graphic novel, Katie is effectively providing hope and education, putting up a strong fight against eating disorders through a creative medium.

Comics are an ideal format through which to explore health issues – the Better, Drawn blog and this recent webcomic chronicle of depression are two examples. I believe that  Lighter Than My Shadow will be an important graphic novel work, even if it’s only regarded as such by a niche, special interest audience. Regardless, it’s a worthy project and I can’t adequately express how much I admire Katie for embarking upon such an epic personal endeavour. This book will potentially do so much good, prevent so much hurt and heartbreak and I believe it will save lives.

Shame and silence kill people and cause awful, unnecessary suffering. People who courageously rise above shame and earnestly open up in public to raise awareness are heroes in my eyes. We should listen to them, learn from them and thank them for their bravery and honesty. If you’re going to take anything from this inarticulate, awkward attempt at writing a serious post, please take this – take care of your health and do whatever you can to help others take care of theirs.

The Working Barbarian Wanders On Towards the West…

Mighty titans of the cybermetaverse! Wanderers of the web wasteland! Travellers trekking across the terrifying realms of T’Interwebs! Lend me your ears or I will take from you by force and have a high time doing the bloody deed with the oversized obsidian bastard sword that was forged for me by a 563-year-old Krip’hlian Kobold armourer!

Now that you are all attention, behold The Life and Times of the Working Barbarian. Over on that blog, Jala’s journey is well under way and she’s opted to head West towards a mysterious settlement exactly as voters on the site instructed her to. The people spoke and it was then my task to take the story forward on this turn and write the next bit which is what I’ve done. I encourage you to go and take a read and have your say on what should happen next to Jala. The Great Magus John of Steele and the rest of us in the Working Barbarian band are frothing at the mouth (at least I am) and waiting on your whims. We’re eager to build up the mythos and fabricate flowing fiction that’s all wrapped up in ripple-effect and the decisions of others. We make the adventure as you make the adventure and all of us are having an adventure. Huzzah for adventure!

Go forth and immerse yourself in the barbarian saga that’s unravelling before your eyes. While you’re there, feel empowered to make a choice and dictate what happens next. It’ll give you a powertrip moment and will effect the fate of Jala in instalments to come. Enjoy and choose wisely, or else you’ll have to answer to an oversized obsidian bastard sword…

A Long Time Ago in a VHS Player Far, Far Away…

May the Fourth be with you! It’s Star Wars Day! I love Star Wars! We love Star Wars! Let’s all dance like the happy Ewoks at the end of Return of the Jedi and celebrate the glorious saga!

I believe we should do this because Star Wars is a bit special and as a fan I think it’s important to take a moment to cherish the precious pop culture phenomenon that’s touched us all, whether we personally wanted it to or not. I will be doing this by listening to John Williams’ scores and by flagrantly dropping quotes and references into as many conversations as possible (this is easy if most of your conversations are with yourself). I will also snatch a few moments to watch some classic movie scenes and may also consider upping the ante on my inactive ‘I Am Han Solo’ campaign.

Swept up in the excitement I thought I might head out today for a frenzied shopping spree and pick up a load of action figures or some Star Wars Lego but I’m best off keeping a tight hold of my few credits and remembering that a Jedi does not value possessions. Still I do have some Star Wars paraphernalia from my childhood knocking around and today is the day for looking at it with a little extra love in my eye. It’s the day for digging it out of cupboards, holding it in a suffocatingly tight grip to then exclaim in your Vader voice “I have you now!

Here’s what I have: triumphant orchestral blast to salute something from a long time ago…

Star Wars! Interactive video board gaming! Destroying the evil Galactic Empire with plastic pieces and cardboard thermal detonator cards!

Star Wars! Interactive video board gaming! Destroying the evil Galactic Empire with plastic pieces and cardboard thermal detonator cards!

Manufactured in 1995, it’s Star Wars: The Interactive Board Game.  It’s here in my hands and I’m desperate to play it with my Rebel comrades for some timely competitive fun on May 4th. Alas, I can’t because I don’t have a VHS player. Star Wars may be eternal, but technology marches on and out-of-date devices die out. Cue sad Wookiee howling or, if you can stand the prequels (and you should stand them and enjoy them), press that Anakin Skywalker Wail button.

Nevertheless, my memories don’t die but linger on and talk to me in moments of cold despair (they’re just like Ben Kenobi appearing to Luke when he’s freezing on Hoth after his escape from captivity beneath the claws of the Wampa). I remember fun sessions in front of the gameboard and TV, listening the instructions of Darth Vader on the screen before me. I remember trying to thwart his villainous plan to destroy the Rebel base on D’rinba IV by depositing bomb cards around his Death Star recreation. Look at those figurines and the nice artwork that graces the playing area!

... nice game with nice details..

… I don’t know what they’ll achieve by putting an R2 unit in the Detention Block…

At a particular point in the game Lord Vader would point at players and say something along the lines of “You! You now taking your turn! I have you now! You will now serve me and exchange your playing piece for the Stormtrooper figure!” And so, the Power of the Dark Side claimed a helpless innocent and they were compelled to bow down and serve the Sith Master. As a child this blatant undermining of any notion of freewill in a boardgame shocked me to the core. Still, the Rebels tended to get it together and triumph over Evil by the time the 60 minutes were up. The Force was strong with them… and they had the remote control to pause if the clock was working against them.

All in all, it was great fun and I’d be forcing it on my family tonight for May the Fourth celebrations if I had the right kit. I don’t so I’m just going to sit and look at it while listening to the Cantina Band tune. It’s also highly likely that I’ll have done a whole load of other saga-related stuff to pay tribute to the space opera that raised me. I urge you to do the same. May the Fourth be with you and May the Force be with you, always…

... and now I'm all choked up...

… and now I’m all choked up…

Fight! Fight! Fight! Clash O’ Th’Captains…

FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT! Captain Haddock vs Captain Birdseye

FIGHT! FIGHT! FIGHT!
Captain Haddock vs Captain Birdseye

Avast ye, slubberdegullion landlubbers! I’ve been writing violent fan-fiction again for the very excellent Andrew Blair‘s Fight! Fight! Fight! blog.

For this round, I set up a depraved sea shanty between two nautical legends held in high esteem by many from an early age. When the Adventures of Tintin encounters the frozen seafood industry it turns out the outcome is profane and particularly savage, indeed. I present for your entertainment, Captain Haddock vs Captain Birdseye.

I encourage you to read it, I hope you enjoy it and I recommend returning to the Fight! Fight! Fight! site to sample more inspired warfare written by great writers.